FrustratedI hear from countless job seekers that they are flummoxed by their recent job search efforts.  After applying for a bunch of roles they are still unemployed…with no idea why.

A quick analysis usually identifies the culprit.  Typically job seekers are being overlooked for one of these 4 reasons:

 

 

  1. Inconsistent Career Target

Without a clear job target, job seekers are applying for jobs like hunters in the dark.  Shots fired without a clearly identified target rarely hit their mark. Similarly, random job applications to a wide array of postings won’t yield results.

Your primary area of interest – job title, position level, industry – should be fleshed out as the first step to your job hunt.  Sometimes desperation can derail focus and cause a ‘wider net to be cast’, but you may be doing more harm than good by applying to jobs haphazardly.

Employ a career coach to help you map out possible career paths and well-suited roles BEFORE you start ‘firing in the dark’. Commission career counselling to support extended job searches.

 

 

  1. Lack of Strategy

Similar to the first point, you need a targeted job search plan.  Utilize modern tactics to help locate suitable positions and get your application into the hands of hiring authorities.

Many job seekers depend heavily on just one application process…ie: online job postings.  After scouring the web for hours….days….weeks…they have wasted valuable time and efforts.

Avoid relying solely on just one job search method.  Diversify your strategy to increase success.  Leverage your network to ask about leads, information, jobs, or referrals.  Attend events to get in front of people.  Boost your online presence and engage with ‘people who know people’ regularly.

 

 

  1. Undetermined Value

If you compare your job search to marketing….you are the commodity that needs to be sold.  Yet if you don’t fully understand the product you are trying to garner interest in, your sale is going to fall flat.

Unearth your unique value and be prepared to package and present your value proposition across various medians (career documents, online profiles, interviews, etc.), with confidence.

If you aren’t sure what sets you apart, partner with a career expert to identify your unique strengths and value.

After you’ve nailed down your forte, be ready to support it with solid, quantifiable business impacts and career achievements that wow!

 

 

  1. Careless Career Tools

Slapping a resume together in a hurry, or sending out a version used many moons ago, makes you look careless and lazy.  Even worse, I regularly review  resumes that are nothing more than job descriptions pasted into employment sections.

Employers carefully analyze resumes.  They can easily spot templates.  They despise reading a laundry list of tasks.  They want problem-solvers not ‘task-completers’.

To ensure that your resume stands up against competitors and gets read – don’t be sloppy.  Employ results-driven statements and rich metrics  to showcase skills and expertise.   If this one document is going to ‘seal the deal’ it has to be GOOD.

Apply this same attention to online profiles, such as your LinkedIn page. Recruiters research candidates online. They judge ability based on the content – or lack thereof.

Position yourself as a strong, capable candidate by beefing up your profile, with the same attention to detail that you give your resume.  Learn about  critical LinkedIn mistakes you should avoid here.

Once a target is identified…take extra time to align the job requirements with your resume and LinkedIn content.  Tailor examples to address the readers’ needs.  Don’t be generic or general in your resume, EVER.  Lack of customization can be a job search killer.

 

With modifications to any/all of the above most job seekers experience increased action and success.

Looking for strategic tools and strategies to escalate your job search?  Visit: www.CareerImpressions.ca to learn more.

4 Reasons Why You Might Still Be Unemployed

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *